Watch Live: White House Addresses Memo Requests on Benghazi Attacks

At the Friday, May 10 White House press briefing, spokesman Jay Carney is expected to field questions about the growing calls for the release of State Department memos rewriting its response to last year's attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

Watch Friday's White House press briefing with White House press secretary Jay Carney, scheduled to begin at 1:45 p.m. ET.

At a White House press briefing Friday at 1:45 p.m. ET, spokesman Jay Carney is expected to field questions about the growing calls for the release of State Department memos rewriting its response to last year's attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. You can watch the press briefing above.

ABC News obtained copies of documents showing the evolution of the administration's response, first written by the CIA and the final version that was distributed to Congress and became U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice's talking points on the Sunday talk shows following the attack on the compound on Sept. 11, 2012. At the time, she said it was a spontaneous demonstration, but it was later attributed to a preplanned terrorist attack.

Edits primarily by the State Department deleted reference to al-Qaida and CIA warnings about terrorist threats prior to the September attack, reported ABC News.

U.S. Amb. Chris Stevens and three other Americans -- Sean Smith, Glen Doherty and Tyrone Woods -- died that day.

On Thursday, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, asked the White House to release documents related to the administration's response to the Benghazi incident.

The press briefing also might address the House's upcoming vote -- slated for Thursday -- to overturn President Obama's health care law, and efforts in the Senate to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

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